527 notes

uvre:

Layered Portrait (After Lucian Freud), Glenn Brown, 2008.

(via lookinginto)

2,496 notes nycartscene:

Fall 2014 Editor’s PickOpens Tues, Sept 9, 6-8p:“RITE OF PASSAGE: The Early Years of Vienna Actionism, 1960 – 1966” Günter Brus, Otto Muehl, Hermann Nitsch, Rudolf SchwarzkoglerHauser & Wirth, 32 East 69th St., NYCthe first major New York City exhibition to explore, through rare paintings, collages, and photographs, the emergence of a critical 20th-century avant-garde movement. Various artistic developments in the second half of the 20th century have been influenced by a performative paradigm that emphasizes a move away from formal, static objects and toward more directly experiential, event-like, and sensorial gestures. In the early 1960s, the Vienna Actionists defined their radical style through a critique of painting, specifically that of European Art Informel and the Abstract Expressionism of the New York School. Under Austria’s Second Republic, Brus, Muehl, Nitsch, and Schwarzkogler sought out new possibilities for expression that could transcend the shadow of World War II. Motivated by material experimentation, they developed their art around radical body-centric performances through which authentic experiences of reality and incisive political statements could be directly and intensely perceived.

nycartscene:

Fall 2014 Editor’s Pick
Opens Tues, Sept 9, 6-8p:

RITE OF PASSAGE: The Early Years of Vienna Actionism, 1960 – 1966”
 Günter Brus, Otto Muehl, Hermann Nitsch, Rudolf Schwarzkogler

Hauser & Wirth, 32 East 69th St., NYC

the first major New York City exhibition to explore, through rare paintings, collages, and photographs, the emergence of a critical 20th-century avant-garde movement. Various artistic developments in the second half of the 20th century have been influenced by a performative paradigm that emphasizes a move away from formal, static objects and toward more directly experiential, event-like, and sensorial gestures. In the early 1960s, the Vienna Actionists defined their radical style through a critique of painting, specifically that of European Art Informel and the Abstract Expressionism of the New York School. Under Austria’s Second Republic, Brus, Muehl, Nitsch, and Schwarzkogler sought out new possibilities for expression that could transcend the shadow of World War II. Motivated by material experimentation, they developed their art around radical body-centric performances through which authentic experiences of reality and incisive political statements could be directly and intensely perceived.

(via rawforms)

2,403 notes "And when two people have loved each other
see how it is like a
scar between their bodies,
stronger, darker, and proud;
how the black cord makes of them a single fabric
that nothing can tear or mend."
Jane Hirshfield, “For What Binds Us” from Of Gravity & Angels. (via literarymiscellany)
428 notes "Mute Autumn odors. The
starflower, unbroken, passed
between home and chasm through
your memory.
A strange lostness was
palpably present, almost
you would
have lived."
Paul Celan, from Poems of Paul Celan, trans. Michael Hamburger (Anvil Press Poetry, 1995)

(Source: ardora, via veneratione)

138 notes "And there comes the hour when nothing more can happen and nobody more can come and all is ended but the waiting that knows itself in vain."
Samuel Beckett, from Malone Dies (via c-ovet)

(Source: litafficionado, via rudyoldeschulte)

48 notes "There are also different clarities. Some things are not meant to be clear; obscurity is their clarity. We should not underestimate obscurity. Obscurity is as rich as luminosity."
Etel Adnan (via jacobwren)

(via alanreedwrite)

32 notes "I like being grown-ups with you doing important
and interesting things. You are brave you
never carry an umbrella you lock all the doors.
You held up the morning’s heavy skies
to let me slip out ok."
Lauren Ireland from April 6 Seattle (via kdecember)
459 notes "Alas! everything is an abyss — action, desire, dreams,
Words!"
Charles Baudelaire, from “The Abyss”, trans. Wallace Fowlie (via mitochondria)

(Source: litverve, via mitochondria)

458 notes

lostinpersona:

A Casa (1997) Dir. Sharunas Bartas

(via tyresias)

20 notes aboriginalnewswire:

(via Photo by brokepimpstyles)

aboriginalnewswire:

(via Photo by brokepimpstyles)

90,910 notes

paulamaf2013:

hayakata:

kropotkindersurprise:

Two ways of dealing with tear gas grenades from comrades in Turkey: Either submerge them in water. Make sure you can close off the container cause the gas will still spread for a while. Or throw them in the fire so the gas burns off before it can spread.

Wow.

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOST

(via calamity-mouse-deactivated20141)

22 notes

(Source: alanreedwrite)

322 notes "Has anything like this happened in history before?
A small piece of land, filled to the brim with people, 50% of them under 16, that cannot run anywhere or escape, that is, every few years, a human laboratory for new bombs and weapons? A human butchery.
What is happening in Gaza will remain, for centuries to come, the most blatant imagery of what is so wrong with this world. The silence and the complicity of our media and most governments adding to what is one of the darkest, most sombre and inhuman act the world has ever seen."
Frank Barat (via lastuli)

(Source: momo33me, via farewell-kingdom)

62 notes "

I don’t believe we can save our civilization;
I do, I do believe it.
I don’t want this poem to be beautiful. I do.
I have no skills; I have no hope; I don’t want
any hope. I simply want to sit here, in this
calm. I don’t want the electricity to fail. I
don’t want war to come here.
I DON’T WANT WAR TO COME HERE!
I sat beneath the tree for awhile. There was only
one tree left. Here it is pouring rain. The two
men are in a contest to take over the world.
They will be voted for to make it seem as if this
is what we want. Don’t ever speak to me from ecstasy,
my life is broken. Tell me what style you like though,

I need to scream: do you have that one?

"
Part of I WENT DOWN THERE in Trickhouse vol 12 by Alice Notley (via tracydimond)

(via kdecember)

142 notes "Worn out by suffering, we lie on our great backs,
   tossing grass up to heaven—as a distraction, not a prayer.

That’s not humility you see on our long final journeys
   it’s procrastination. It hurts my heavy body to lie down."
Dan Chiasson, from “The Elephant” (via mitochondria)